Robert Kiyosaki Blog

Financial Education Portal inspired by Robert Kiyosaki


NIA: Proof Gold Stocks Most Undervalued in History

On Sunday when NIA suggested January 2015 GDX $25 call options, we showed you a chart of the HUI/Gold ratio. The HUI index for the most part tracks the same exact stocks owned by GDX. The HUI/Gold ratio shows how undervalued gold stocks are vs. the price of gold. The HUI/Gold ratio has a 17 year average of 0.37 and currently is down to 0.164, the lowest it has been since 2001, at the very beginning of gold’s secular bull market.   However, this doesn’t tell the complete story. Gold miners have seen their expenses go through the roof – a fact that proves there is massive price inflation, despite what the gold bears say. A big portion of a gold miner’s expenses are related to energy. Therefore, the Gold/Oil ratio is another important chart to look at. In June/July of 2008, when oil soared to well over $130 per barrel, the Gold/Oil ratio declined to below 7. From year 1970 through today, the Gold/Oil ratio has averaged 15.19. Currently, we have a Gold/Oil ratio of 12.22.   A low Gold/Oil ratio is bad for gold miners, because their expenses are high relative to the gold they produce. The current Gold/Oil ratio, although below the long-term average, is not at an extreme level like in June/July of 2008. Oil prices, although expensive, are not high enough to severely hurt gold miners in a way that justifies a HUI/Gold ratio of less than half its long-term average. If we currently had a Gold/Oil ratio of 7, a HUI/Gold ratio of 0.164 would be justified, but right now there is no justification to the current artificially low HUI/Gold ratio.   Below, we are once again going to provide you with the HUI/Gold ratio chart we showed you on Sunday. After that we will show you a chart of the Gold/Oil ratio. Following those two charts is a chart of a new ratio that NIA has invented – the Gold/Oil to HUI/Gold ratio. NIA’s Gold/Oil to HUI/Gold ratio has a 14-year average of 37.68. A high Gold/Oil to HUI/Gold ratio of well above its long-term average indicates that gold stocks are undervalued relative to their potential profitability.   Historically, any extreme highs in the Gold/Oil to HUI/Gold ratio were an excellent time to buy gold stocks. In December of 2000, when it spiked up to above 60, the HUI was priced at 177.61. When the Gold/Oil to HUI/Gold ratio returned to a more normal level of 39.63 in June of 2001, the HUI was up to 276.24 for a gain of 56% in six months. In December of 2001, when it spiked up to...

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NIA: Gold’s Previous Bottoms vs. Today

Please disregard our email from Sunday evening, which stated that gold’s high of $850 per oz in 1980 is the equivalent of $5,301.24 per oz today after adjusting for growth in real U.S. money supply and above ground gold stocks. Gold’s 1980 high of $850 per oz is actually the equivalent of $7,944.83 per oz in today’s economy. Furthermore, gold’s 1976 low of $103.50 per oz is the equivalent of $1,096.12 per oz in today’s economy. Gold’s 1985 low of $285.75 per oz is the equivalent of $1,276.25 per oz in today’s economy.   The average of gold’s lows in 1976 and 1985 are the equivalent of $1,186.19 per oz in today’s economy. This is within 0.5% of gold’s June 28, 2013, low of $1,192 per oz, which gold once again dipped to last week. This could be a double bottom for gold.   During its 1971-1980 nine year bull rally, gold rose from a low of $35 in 1971 to a high of $195 in 1974 for a gain of 457.1%, followed by a dip to a low of $103.50 in 1976 for a decline of 46.8%, and then an additional gain of 721.3% to a high of $850 in 1980 – for a total gain of 2,329%. After the Fed raised interest rates to 20%, gold over the following five years lost 2/3 of its value, bottoming in 1985 at $285.75.   Mid-way through its secular bear market, when gold dipped 46.9% to a low on August 25, 1976, of $103.50 per oz: the real U.S. money supply as of August 23, 1976, was comprised of: 1) currency component of M1: $77.5 billion, 2) total checkable deposits: $219 billion, and 3) total savings deposits at all depository institutions: $185.9 billion – for a total real money supply of $482.4 billion.   Currently, the real U.S. money supply as of December, 16, 2013, is comprised of 1) currency component of M1: $1.1596 trillion, 2) total checkable deposits: $1.4828 trillion, 3) total savings deposits at all depository institutions: $7.1513 trillion – for a total real money supply of $9.7937 trillion. The real U.S. money supply has grown 20.30X in size since August 23, 1976.   According to the World Gold Council, the world’s total above ground gold stocks mined throughout history as of the end of 2012 were 174,100 tonnes, and after production from this past year – their figures will likely show total above ground gold stocks of approximately 177,000 tonnes. However, in recent days, several NIA members have contacted us with compelling evidence that the World Gold Council’s data is overstating above ground gold stocks by approximately...

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Philip Judge on Phase Transition in 2014

The town of Lugano lies on Lake Lugano nestled in the Swiss Alps in Italian-speaking southern Switzerland, arguably one of the most beautiful old towns in all of Europe. Dinning in Lugano one evening last month with Alex Stanczyk and Jim Rickards, the conversation turned to ‘Complexity Theory.’ Jim spends several pages describing details of the Theory in Chapter 10 of his excellent bestselling book Currency Wars: The Making of the Next Global Crisis (1). One thing I learned from the dinner is that Complexity Theory is complex. However, the theory could be summarized as follows: Complex systems continuously produce surprising results. When systems are highly complex, emergent properties are far more powerful and unexpected. A great example Jim points out is climate which is one of the most complex systems humans can study. Despite thousands of years of observing and studying climate and weather patterns, and despite all the science and tools we have at our disposal today, it is still not possible for us to accurately predict the weather more than four days in advance due to its complexity. Another important aspect of Complexity Theory is what is known as ‘Phase Transition.’ Phase Transition describes when a complex system changes its state. Again, Jim uses two good examples from nature. When a volcano erupts, there is a Phase Transition in the state of the volcano from dormant to active. A second example would be an avalanche. Snow may fall on a steep incline for a long period of time; however, eventually the snow field will reach a critical state. Finally, one single snow flake will trigger a Phase Transition called an avalanche. Phase Transition demonstrates how catastrophic effects can be triggered from small causes; a single snow flake can cause a village to be destroyed through an avalanche. Yet another feature of Complexity Theory is the frequency of ‘Extreme Events.’ Conventional wisdom suggests that small events happen all the time, while extreme events happen rarely. Manmade systems grow in size and complexity all the time, while more manmade systems become connected and interconnected. As the group of manmade systems grow in size and complexity and as a whole move toward critical state, the risk of catastrophic Phase Transitions grows exponentially. “If the size of the system is doubled, the risk does not merely double – it increases by a factor of ten. If the system is doubled again, the risk increases by a factor of one hundred. Double it again, and risk increases by a factor of one thousand, and so forth,” states Jim. This leads to a point where Extreme Events are no longer happening rarely...

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Keiser Report Talks Silver – Jim Rickards – Dollar Collapse – E525

In this episode of the Keiser Report, Max Keiser and Stacy Herbert discuss the melt down in the art market as the filthy rich scramble for safe havens from the taxpayers angry at the billions in free money they’ve been given. They also discuss financial irrigation, amputated gold and a special mince meat pie and Jamie stew for Christmas. In the second half, Max interviews Jim Rickards, author of Currency Wars, about central bank vaporware, straws in the dollar wind and about how Janet Yellen is to Ben Bernanke as Miley Cyrus is to Lady Gaga – trashier than the original. Share and...

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More Nails In The U.S. Dollar’s Coffin – Mike Maloney

Government shutdown? Inefficient politicians? These things are nothing new, and pale in comparison to the real story developing quietly behind the noise and hoopla we receive from the press. The death of the U.S. dollar as the global reserve currency is the elephant in the room that nobody wants to acknowledge. It’s only been a short while since Michael Maloney delivered his keynote speech ‘Death Of The Dollar Standard’ in Singapore, where he showed the events that add up to conclusive evidence of a global move away from the U.S Dollar Standard. Bilateral trade agreements, avoidance of the U.S. Dollar in trade, repatriation of gold — Michael Maloney deemed them all to be ‘nails in the coffin’ of the dollar standard. You would have seen in Mike’s presentation that these events are speeding up. By the time Episode 3 of Hidden Secrets Of Money was released to the public, there were even more events that qualify as nails in the coffin. So to get up to speed with the big picture, please watch the accompanying video for a preview of Michael’s exclusive Bonus Presentation ‘Latest Nails In The Dollar Standard’s Coffin’. In this video Mike presents some jaw-dropping information that picks up where the timeline from Episode 3 finished. Share and...

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Peter Schiff Says Beware of Bitcoin!

In his latest video, Peter Schiff shares his thoughts on the bitcoin mania that is sweeping the world. After rising from less than $20 to more than $600 in one year, many investors are wondering if bitcoin might be worth the risk. Early adopters pitch bitcoin as “gold 2.0″ – a digital currency that cannot be manipulated like fiat money. Bitcoins are even “mined,” similar to physical gold and silver. However, Peter explains why bitcoins still fail as a substitute for gold and strongly urges investors to avoid this risky new currency. Bitcoin could very well have already hit its top, but Peter is confident gold is still well below its future record highs. Share and...

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The Single Biggest Reason Most Investors LOSE Money

It’s almost never openly admitted in public, but the reality is that few if any investors actually beat the market in the long-term. The reason for this is that most of the investment strategies employed by investors (professional or amateur) simply do not make money. I know this runs counter to the claims of the entire financial services industry. But it is factually correct. In 2012, the S&P 500 roared up 16% including dividends. During that period, less than 40% of fund managers beat the market. Most investors could have simply invested in an index fund, paid less in fees, and done better. If you spread out performance over the last two years (2011 and 2012) the results are even worsen with only 10% of funds beating the market. If we stretch back even further, the results are even more dismal. For the ten years ended 1Q 2013, a mere 0.4% of mutual funds have beaten the market. 0.4%, as in less than half of one percent of funds. These are investment “professionals,” folks whose jobs depend on producing gains, who cannot beat the market for any significant period. The reason this fact is not better known is because the mutual fund industry usually closes its losing funds or merges them with other, better performing funds. As a result, the mutual fund industry in general experiences a tremendous survivor bias. But the cold hard fact what I told you earlier: less than half of one percent of fund managers outperform the market over a ten-year period. So how does one beat the market? Cigar Butts and Moats. “Cigar butts” was a term used by the father of value investing, Benjamin Graham, to describe investing in companies that trade at significant discounts to their underlying values. Graham likened these companies to old, used cigar butts that had been discarded, but which had just one more puff left in them. Like discarded cigar butts, these investments were essentially “free”: investors had discarded them based on the perception that they had no value. However, many of these cigar butts do in fact have on last puff in them. And for a shrewd investor like Benjamin Graham, that last puff was the profit potential obtained by acquiring these companies at prices below their intrinsic value (below the value of the companies assets plus cash, minus its liabilities). Graham used a lot of diversification, investing in hundreds of “cigar butts” to produce average annual gains of 20%, far outpacing the S&P 500’s 12.2% per year over the same time period. So when I say that you can amass a fortune by investing in Cigar...

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The adverse effects of monetary stimulation

By Alasdair Macleod There are two indisputable economic facts to bear in mind. The first is that GDP is simply a money-total of economic transactions, and a central bank fosters an increase in GDP by making available more money and therefore bank credit to inflate this number. This is not the same as genuine economic progress, which is what consumers desire and entrepreneurs provide in an unfettered market with reliable money. The second fact is that newly issued money is not absorbed into an economy evenly: it has to be handed to someone first, like a bank or government department, who in turn passes it on to someone else through their dealings and so on, step by step until it is finally dispersed. As new money enters the economy, it naturally drives up the prices of goods bought with it. This means that someone seeking to buy a similar product without the benefit of new money finds it is more expensive, or put more correctly the purchasing power of his wages and savings has fallen relative to that product. Therefore, the new money benefits those that first obtain it at the expense of everyone else. Obviously, if large amounts of new money are being mobilised by a central bank, as is the case today, the transfer of wealth from those who receive the money later to those who get it early will be correspondingly greater. Now let’s look at today’s monetary environment in the United States. The wealth-transfer effect is not being adequately recorded, because official inflation statistics do not capture the real increase in consumer prices. The difference between official figures and a truer estimate of US inflation is illustrated by John Williams of, who estimates it to be 7% higher than the official rate at roughly 9%, using the government’s computation methodology prior to 1980. Simplistically and assuming no wage inflation, this approximates to the current rate of wealth transfer from the majority of people to those that first receive the new money from the central bank. The Fed is busy financing most of the Government’s borrowing. The newly-issued money in Government’s hands is distributed widely, and maintains prices of most basic goods and services at a higher level than they would otherwise be. However, in providing this funding, the Fed creates excess reserves on its own balance sheet, and it is this money we are considering.The reserves on the Fed’s balance sheet are actually deposits, the assets of commercial banks and other domestic and foreign depository institutions that use the Fed as a bank, in the same way the rest of us have bank deposits...

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Simon Black – This one chart shows you who’s really in control

November 7, 2013 Bangkok, Thailand Check out this chart below. It’s a graph of total US tax revenue as a percentage of the money supply, since 1900. For example, in 1928, at the peak of the Roaring 20s, US money supply (M2) was $ 46.4 billion. That same year, the US government took in $ 3.9 billion in tax revenue. So in 1928, tax revenue was 8.4% of the money supply. In contrast, at the height of World War II in 1944, US tax revenue had increased to $ 42.4 billion. But money supply had also grown substantially, to $ 106.8 billion. So in 1944, tax revenue was 39.74% of money supply. You can see from this chart that over the last 113 years, tax revenue as a percentage of the nation’s money supply has swung wildly, from as little as 3.65% to over 40%. But something interesting happened in the 1970s. 1971 was a bifurcation point, and this model went from chaotic to stable. Since 1971, in fact, US tax revenue as a percentage of money supply has been almost a constant, steady 20%. You can see this graphically below as we zoom in on the period from 1971 through 2013– the trend line is very flat. What does this mean? Remember– 1971 was the year that Richard Nixon severed the dollar’s convertibility to gold once and for all. And in doing so, he handed unchecked, unrestrained, total control of the money supply to the Federal Reserve. That’s what makes this data so interesting. Prior to 1971, there was ZERO correlation between US tax revenue and money supply. Yet almost immediately after they handed the last bit of monetary control to the Federal Reserve, suddenly a very tight correlation emerged. Furthermore, since 1971, marginal tax rates and tax brackets have been all over the board. In the 70s, for example, the highest marginal tax was a whopping 70%. In the 80s it dropped to 28%. And yet, the entire time, total US tax revenue has remained very tightly correlated to the money supply. The conclusion is simple: People think they’re living in some kind of democratic republic. But the politicians they elect have zero control. It doesn’t matter who you elect, what the politicians do, or how high/low they set tax rates. They could tax the rich. They could destroy the middle class. It doesn’t matter. The fiscal revenues in the Land of the Free rest exclusively in the hands of a tiny banking elite. Everything else is just an illusion to conceal the truth… and make people think that they’re in control. This one chart shows you...

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Anglo Far East – Flying by Sight Versus Instruments

Flying by Sight Versus Instruments “VFR”Visual Flight rules “IFR” Instrument Flight Rules As sponsor of a GATA presentation in Auckland by the chairman- Chris Powell over the weekend, I had the pleasure of spending time and picking his brain on many subjects. High on the list was the current correction in gold and its seeming long and sustained period of flat or lower prices. There are many measures to gauge the market but one of the best is outright sentiment and he said that for every 100 people that would have had contact with him in times past, the number is more like 20 now. If I take that same sentiment gauge and cross it over to the exploration/ junior mining sector and even the mid-tier and senior one you get a really sad story. Here is what a professional capitulation looks like from a seasoned mining writer that makes his living selling information 1/ convince me that the resource sector recovery expected this fall is no longer valid. Even the strongest companies are now weakening again and I think this is a strong indica­tion that our market troubles will continue well into next year. This unfortunate chain of events leads me to believe that we should not be buying any junior mining stocks right now. 2/ Many of us, including myself, beefed up positions in companies like “%$” thinking this would be the start of getting our portfolios back on track. It hasn’t happened and I have never felt more discouraged about anything I have dealt with in my entire life. It has felt like an emotional earthquake to my soul. 3/ Even during the 2008 meltdown situation, I felt more composed and confident because I knew we would rebound, which we did within a relatively short-period of time. But this current market situa­tion has gone from bad, to worse, to intolerable with further downside very likely. 4/ I even wrote many times in the last several years that before the screaming, parabolic market in our favour would happen we may have to deal with downside volatility that would shake us to the core. But what we are experiencing now is beyond even what I thought could happen. This is a wipe-out that will basically eliminate at least another 35% of the junior mining companies that are currently still in business. This is after those who have already shut their doors. Many more are hanging by their fingernails right now. I thought by moving towards those companies with the best assets or near-term production stories that we would protect ourselves until the dust you spoke about settled. I...

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